The Dickens Inn is an original warehouse building near Tower Bridge, the Tower of London, and The Shard. Dating back to the 18th century, it is thought to have been built in the early 1700s as a tea factory or a local brewery.

Years later, it was converted into a local tavern, with sawdust strewn floors and no bottled or canned beer would have been stocked. Diners also enjoyed candlelit meals on the balconies; this practice has been phased out due to modern fire safety regulations!

Loved by locals and tourists alike

This showstopper of a pub, which looks like it is straight off the set of Game of Thrones, is a three-tiered, thatched-roofed, eighteenth-century, timber-framed warehouse. The raised seating makes it the ideal viewing point to spy on wealthy local residents and their aquatic investments.

- Marcus Brown (Time Out London)

History

The original building stood just east of its current location. In the 1820s, its timber frame was encased in a more modern brick shell to make the warehouse conform to the architectural style of St. Katharine Docks, masterminded by the highly celebrated Scottish Civil Engineer; Thomas Telford.

Re-building

All 120 tonnes of The Dickens Inn were moved 70 meters east to make room for a new housing development. The original timbers, tailboards, and ironwork were used in the restoration and the building was reconstructed in the style of a three-story balconied inn of the 18th century.

Charles Dickens

"My Great Grandfather would have loved this inn"

In May 1976, The Dickens Inn was opened by the grandson of Charles Dickens, Cedric Charles Dickens.

Charles Dickens was particularly fond of Thameside and East London with his work being stocked with characters and scenes memorably linked with the area.

PRIVACY POLICY | COOKIE POLICY   |   CONTACT   |   CAREERS